Southern New England Weather

Weather, astronomy and nature info for Southern New England from the Berkshires to Boston. Custom-coded in-house temperature and dew point maps and unique Storm-Track radar. Weather history, climate statistics and more with forecasts and imagery updated throughout the day.

The Todd Gross websites contain many fun-filled facts, statistics and graphics, all produced for him here throughout the day. Since it is the nature of weather to be in constant flux the content changes often. The website ToddGross.com itself is published in a "blog" format. As such it does not lend itself well to content management or custom coding. We are working on ways to bring you the weather - both current and historical - in the most efficient, timely, versatile way. The end result may be a combination of blog and standard-hosted content. In the interim, selected content will be available at the blog site with the full month's information posted here for such as Historical Weather and Monthly Averages.
LN
Some forecast and analysis content derived from NWS and NOAA sources.

Five Day Forecast

SUNRISE/SUNSET CHARTS      MASSACHUSETTS TIDE CHARTS
MARINE FORECAST  MARINE GRAPHICAL    BUOY REPORT

Where did the 5 day graphicals go ?
The traditional 5 day graphics have been replaced by a combination of expanded audio and supplemental event-specific graphics. Temperatures, fronts, winds and non-day-to-day weather features can be highlighted with special graphics better than they could be with the standard basic 5 day image.

5 Day Boston Metro 5 Day West/Metro

Supplemental Discussion and Updates:

EXCERPTS from the NWS Discussion:

NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE TAUNTON MA
525 AM EST MON JAN 22 2007

.LONG TERM /TUESDAY NIGHT THROUGH SUNDAY/...

IT APPEARS THAT THE UPPER PATTERN REMAINS RATHER 
BROAD AND FAST ACROSS THE EASTERN U.S. FOR TUESDAY NIGHT INTO 
WEDNESDAY...BUT CHANGES LURK ON THE HORIZON.  AS FOR THE SURFACE 
FEATURES...EXPECT WEAK SURFACE LOW PRESSURE OVER CENTRAL QUEBEC 
/WHICH IS ASSOCIATED WITH A RATHER DEEP CUTOFF UPPER LEVEL LOW 
DIVING OUT OF THE ARCTIC CIRCLE/ TO SHIFT SOUTHEAST WITH A COLD 
FRONT. THE COLD FRONT WILL TEND TO LOSE ITS MOISTURE AS IT MOVES 
ACROSS NORTHERN NEW ENGLAND BY WEDNESDAY NIGHT...SO EXPECT A DRY 
FRONTAL PASSAGE EXCEPT FOR AN ISOLATED SNOW SHOWER. ONLY CARRIED 
SLIGHT CHANCE POPS FOR NORTHERN AND WESTERN AREAS WEDNESDAY 
AFTERNOON AND EVENING. EXPECT FRONT TO PUSH OFF THE SOUTHERN NEW 
ENGLAND COAST BY 06Z THURSDAY.

ONCE THIS FRONT CLEARS THE COAST...OH MY DOES IT GET COLD. ...













Best wishes for a speedy and full recovery to our fri
End and colleague Josh Judge of WMUR
who was injured in an auto accident Friday, December 8.
Josh is making a return to work.
See him at WMUR.

Experience the awe and power of the summit of Mount Washington through the Observer Journals.

Mount Washington Observatory Observer Archive20:54 PM Sun Dec 17th:
"...Its fortunate that the few calm moments around the peak the past few days have allows some rather spectacular sights. Of course the aurora late last week sticks out in our minds, but cap clouds, lenticulars and halos have all been enjoyed by the summit staff. Also on the summit during the calmer periods have been the summit foxes, now numbering three. Tracks are typically seen all over the mountain range in the winter, and it was exciting to see the whole family (?) around the summit at once the other evening...."

1IN

This Month's Daily Normals - February

Daily "Normal" values for Worcester, MA

Dy MaxT AveT MinT HDD  MHDD  PcpD  PcpM  SnwD  SnwM  SnwG  PcpYr
 1 31.7 23.8 15.9 41.2   41 0.118  0.12  0.47   0.5   5.0   4.18
 2 31.8 23.9 16.1 41.1   82 0.116  0.23  0.47   0.9   5.0   4.30
 3 31.9 24.0 16.2 41.0  123 0.114  0.35  0.46   1.4   5.0   4.41
 4 32.0 24.2 16.3 40.9  164 0.113  0.46  0.46   1.9   5.0   4.52
 5 32.2 24.3 16.4 40.8  205 0.112  0.57  0.46   2.3   5.1   4.63
 6 32.3 24.4 16.5 40.6  246 0.111  0.68  0.45   2.8   5.1   4.75
 7 32.4 24.5 16.7 40.5  286 0.109  0.79  0.45   3.2   5.1   4.85
 8 32.6 24.7 16.8 40.4  326 0.109  0.90  0.44   3.7   5.1   4.96
 9 32.7 24.8 17.0 40.2  367 0.108  1.01  0.44   4.1   5.1   5.07
10 32.9 25.0 17.1 40.0  407 0.107  1.12  0.44   4.5   5.1   5.18
11 33.1 25.2 17.3 39.9  447 0.106  1.22  0.43   5.0   5.0   5.28
12 33.3 25.4 17.4 39.7  486 0.106  1.33  0.43   5.4   5.0   5.39
13 33.5 25.5 17.6 39.5  526 0.106  1.43  0.42   5.8   5.0   5.50
14 33.7 25.7 17.8 39.3  565 0.106  1.54  0.42   6.2   4.9   5.60
15 33.9 25.9 18.0 39.1  604 0.106  1.65  0.42   6.7   4.9   5.71
16 34.1 26.1 18.2 38.9  643 0.106  1.75  0.41   7.1   4.9   5.81
17 34.3 26.3 18.4 38.7  682 0.106  1.86  0.41   7.5   4.8   5.92
18 34.5 26.6 18.6 38.5  720 0.106  1.96  0.41   7.9   4.7   6.02
19 34.8 26.8 18.8 38.3  759 0.107  2.07  0.41   8.3   4.7   6.13
20 35.0 27.0 19.0 38.0  797 0.107  2.18  0.40   8.7   4.6   6.24
21 35.3 27.3 19.2 37.8  834 0.108  2.28  0.40   9.1   4.5   6.35
22 35.5 27.5 19.5 37.5  872 0.109  2.39  0.40   9.5   4.4   6.45
23 35.8 27.8 19.7 37.3  909 0.110  2.50  0.40   9.9   4.4   6.56
24 36.1 28.0 19.9 37.0  946 0.111  2.61  0.39  10.3   4.3   6.68
25 36.4 28.3 20.2 36.7  983 0.112  2.73  0.39  10.7   4.2   6.79
26 36.7 28.6 20.5 36.4 1019 0.113  2.84  0.39  11.1   4.1   6.90
27 37.0 28.8 20.7 36.1 1055 0.115  2.95  0.39  11.5   4.0   7.01
28 37.3 29.1 21.0 35.9 1091 0.116  3.07  0.38  11.8   3.8   7.13
29 37.6 29.4 21.3 35.5 1127 0.118  3.19  0.38  12.2   3.7   7.25

Daily "Normal" values for Boston, MA

Dy MaxT AveT MinT HDD  MHDD  PcpD  PcpM  SnwD  SnwM  SnwG  PcpYr 
 1 36.5 29.3 22.1 35.7   36 0.122  0.12  0.43   0.4   2.6   4.05
 2 36.6 29.4 22.2 35.6   71 0.121  0.24  0.42   0.8   2.5   4.17
 3 36.7 29.5 22.3 35.5  107 0.120  0.36  0.42   1.3   2.5   4.29
 4 36.8 29.6 22.4 35.4  142 0.119  0.48  0.41   1.7   2.4   4.41
 5 37.0 29.7 22.5 35.3  178 0.119  0.60  0.41   2.1   2.4   4.53
 6 37.1 29.9 22.6 35.2  213 0.118  0.72  0.40   2.5   2.3   4.65
 7 37.2 30.0 22.8 35.0  248 0.118  0.84  0.40   2.9   2.3   4.77
 8 37.3 30.1 22.9 34.9  283 0.117  0.95  0.40   3.3   2.2   4.88
 9 37.5 30.3 23.0 34.8  317 0.117  1.07  0.39   3.7   2.2   5.00
10 37.6 30.4 23.2 34.6  352 0.117  1.19  0.39   4.1   2.2   5.12
11 37.8 30.6 23.3 34.5  387 0.116  1.30  0.38   4.5   2.1   5.23
12 37.9 30.7 23.5 34.3  421 0.116  1.42  0.38   4.8   2.1   5.35
13 38.1 30.9 23.7 34.2  455 0.116  1.54  0.38   5.2   2.0   5.46
14 38.3 31.0 23.8 34.0  489 0.116  1.65  0.37   5.6   2.0   5.58
15 38.4 31.2 24.0 33.8  523 0.115  1.77  0.37   5.9   1.9   5.69
16 38.6 31.4 24.2 33.6  556 0.115  1.88  0.36   6.3   1.9   5.81
17 38.8 31.6 24.4 33.4  590 0.115  2.00  0.36   6.7   1.9   5.93
18 39.0 31.8 24.6 33.2  623 0.115  2.11  0.36   7.0   1.8   6.04
19 39.2 32.0 24.8 33.0  656 0.116  2.23  0.35   7.4   1.8   6.16
20 39.4 32.2 25.0 32.8  689 0.116  2.34  0.35   7.7   1.7   6.27
21 39.7 32.4 25.2 32.6  722 0.116  2.46  0.34   8.1   1.7   6.39
22 39.9 32.6 25.4 32.4  754 0.116  2.58  0.34   8.4   1.6   6.50
23 40.1 32.9 25.6 32.1  786 0.116  2.69  0.34   8.7   1.6   6.62
24 40.4 33.1 25.8 31.9  818 0.117  2.81  0.33   9.1   1.5   6.74
25 40.6 33.3 26.1 31.7  850 0.117  2.93  0.33   9.4   1.5   6.85
26 40.8 33.6 26.3 31.4  881 0.117  3.04  0.32   9.7   1.5   6.97
27 41.1 33.8 26.6 31.2  912 0.118  3.16  0.32  10.0   1.4   7.09
28 41.4 34.1 26.8 30.9  943 0.118  3.28  0.32  10.4   1.4   7.21
29 41.6 34.3 27.1 30.6  974 0.119  3.40  0.31  10.7   1.3   7.33


Daily "Normal" values for Cummington Hill, MA

Dy MaxT MinT AvgT HDD PcpD
 1  29   11  20   45  0.12
 2  29   11  20   45  0.12
 3  29   11  20   45  0.11
 4  29   11  20   45  0.11
 5  29   12  21   45  0.11
 6  30   12  21   44  0.11
 7  30   12  21   44  0.11
 8  30   12  21   44  0.11
 9  30   12  21   44  0.11
10  30   12  21   44  0.11
11  30   12  21   44  0.11
12  31   13  22   43  0.11
13  31   13  22   43  0.11
14  31   13  22   43  0.11
15  31   13  22   43  0.11
16  31   13  22   43  0.11
17  32   14  23   42  0.11
18  32   14  23   42  0.11
19  32   14  23   42  0.11
20  32   14  23   42  0.11
21  33   14  24   41  0.11
22  33   15  24   41  0.11
23  33   15  24   41  0.11
24  34   15  25   41  0.11
25  34   16  25   40  0.11
26  34   16  25   40  0.11
27  35   16  25   40  0.11
28  35   16  26   39  0.12

Daily "Normal" values for Windsor Locks, CT

Dy MaxT AveT MinT HDD  MHDD  PcpD  PcpM  SnwD  SnwM  SnwG  PcpYr 
 1 34.8 26.1 17.4 39.0   39 0.112  0.11  0.41   0.4   3.3   3.95
 2 34.9 26.2 17.5 38.8   78 0.111  0.22  0.40   0.8   3.3   4.06
 3 35.0 26.3 17.6 38.7  116 0.109  0.33  0.40   1.2   3.2   4.17
 4 35.2 26.5 17.8 38.6  155 0.108  0.44  0.40   1.6   3.2   4.28
 5 35.4 26.6 17.9 38.4  193 0.107  0.55  0.39   2.0   3.2   4.39
 6 35.5 26.8 18.1 38.2  232 0.106  0.65  0.39   2.4   3.1   4.49
 7 35.7 27.0 18.2 38.1  270 0.105  0.76  0.39   2.8   3.1   4.60
 8 35.9 27.1 18.4 37.9  308 0.104  0.86  0.38   3.2   3.0   4.70
 9 36.1 27.3 18.5 37.7  345 0.103  0.96  0.38   3.5   3.0   4.80
10 36.3 27.5 18.7 37.5  383 0.103  1.07  0.38   3.9   2.9   4.91
11 36.5 27.7 18.9 37.3  420 0.102  1.17  0.37   4.3   2.9   5.01
12 36.7 27.9 19.1 37.1  457 0.102  1.27  0.37   4.7   2.8   5.11
13 36.9 28.1 19.3 36.9  494 0.101  1.37  0.37   5.0   2.8   5.21
14 37.2 28.3 19.5 36.7  531 0.101  1.47  0.36   5.4   2.7   5.31
15 37.4 28.6 19.7 36.5  568 0.101  1.57  0.36   5.8   2.7   5.41
16 37.7 28.8 19.9 36.2  604 0.101  1.68  0.36   6.1   2.6   5.51
17 37.9 29.0 20.1 36.0  640 0.101  1.78  0.35   6.5   2.5   5.62
18 38.2 29.3 20.3 35.8  676 0.101  1.88  0.35   6.8   2.5   5.72
19 38.5 29.5 20.6 35.5  711 0.102  1.98  0.35   7.2   2.4   5.82
20 38.8 29.8 20.8 35.2  746 0.102  2.08  0.34   7.5   2.4   5.92
21 39.1 30.1 21.1 35.0  781 0.103  2.19  0.34   7.9   2.3   6.02
22 39.3 30.3 21.3 34.7  816 0.104  2.29  0.34   8.2   2.2   6.13
23 39.7 30.6 21.6 34.4  850 0.104  2.39  0.33   8.5   2.2   6.23
24 40.0 30.9 21.9 34.1  884 0.105  2.50  0.33   8.9   2.1   6.34
25 40.3 31.2 22.1 33.8  918 0.106  2.60  0.32   9.2   2.0   6.44
26 40.6 31.5 22.4 33.5  952 0.107  2.71  0.32   9.5   2.0   6.55
27 41.0 31.8 22.7 33.2  985 0.108  2.82  0.32   9.8   1.9   6.66
28 41.3 32.2 23.0 32.8 1018 0.110  2.93  0.31  10.1   1.8   6.77
29 41.7 32.5 23.3 32.5 1050 0.111  3.04  0.31  10.4   1.7   6.88

Daily "Normal" values for Nantucket FAA Airport

Dy MaxT MinT AvgT HDD PcpD
 1  38   24  31   34  0.11
 2  38   24  31   34  0.11
 3  38   25  31   34  0.11
 4  38   25  31   34  0.11
 5  38   25  31   34  0.10
 6  38   25  32   33  0.10
 7  38   25  32   33  0.10
 8  38   25  32   33  0.10
 9  38   25  32   33  0.10
10  39   25  32   33  0.10
11  39   25  32   33  0.10
12  39   25  32   33  0.09
13  39   25  32   33  0.09
14  39   25  32   33  0.09
15  39   26  32   33  0.09
16  39   26  32   33  0.09
17  39   26  32   33  0.09
18  39   26  33   32  0.09
19  39   26  33   32  0.09
20  40   26  33   32  0.09
21  40   26  33   32  0.09
22  40   27  33   32  0.09
23  40   27  33   32  0.09
24  40   27  34   31  0.09
25  40   27  34   31  0.10
26  41   27  34   31  0.10
27  41   27  34   31  0.10
28  41   28  34   31  0.10


Daily "Normal" values for Hyannis

Dy MaxT MinT AvgT HDD PcpD
 1  37   20  29   37  0.12
 2  37   21  29   37  0.12
 3  37   21  29   36  0.12
 4  37   21  29   36  0.12
 5  37   21  29   36  0.12
 6  37   21  29   36  0.12
 7  37   21  29   36  0.12
 8  37   21  29   36  0.12
 9  37   21  29   36  0.12
10  37   21  29   36  0.12
11  37   21  29   36  0.12
12  37   21  29   36  0.12
13  37   22  29   36  0.11
14  37   22  30   35  0.11
15  38   22  30   35  0.11
16  38   22  30   35  0.11
17  38   22  30   35  0.11
18  38   22  30   35  0.11
19  38   23  30   35  0.11
20  38   23  31   34  0.12
21  38   23  31   34  0.12
22  39   23  31   34  0.12
23  39   23  31   34  0.12
24  39   24  31   34  0.12
25  39   24  32   33  0.12
26  39   24  32   33  0.12
27  40   24  32   33  0.12
28  40   25  32   33  0.12

Dy        Day
MaxT      Maximum Temperature
AveT      Average Temperature
MinT      Minimum Temperature
HDD       Daily Heating Degree Days
MHDD      Cumulative Monthly Heating Degree Days
PcpD      Daily Precipitation
PcpM      Cumulative Monthly Precipitation
SnwD      Daily Snowfall
SnwM      Cumulative Montly Snowfall
SnwG      Snow On The Ground
PcpYr     Cumulative Precipitation For The Year\

Source: NWS Miscellaneous Climate Records and Averages

Southern New England Weather History


Coming up in February - The Blizzard of 1978
From the NWS Archives
-
Significant Weather Events for Boston and Southern New England -
Jan 1  High wind gusts to 80 mph in eastern MA associated with near blizzard in northern New England, 1969.
Jan 2-3 13 Inches of snow, 1996
11.8 Inches of snow, 1904
Jan 3 Latest ever measurable snow into a winter season, .6 inches, 1974
Jan 4 Coldest high temperature, 3 degrees, 1904
Jan 6 Severe ice storm, 1994
Jan 6-8 16.2 inches of snow, 1994
Jan 7 13.8 inches of snow, 1977
Jan 7-8 Blizzard of 1996 dumps 17.3 inches in 24 hours. (second greatest Jan. 24 hour total) Storm total was 18.2 inches (2nd greatest Jan.)
Jan 8-9 11.8 inches of snow, 1904
Jan 10 Record highest snow depth ever, 32 inches, 1996
Jan 11-12 12.1 inches of snow, 1976
Jan 13-14 Blizzard dropped 10-20 inches of snow over southern New England.   Large drifts were created by gales, 1964
Jan 15 Blizzard in eastern Massachusetts creates drifts to 5 feet, 1965
Jan 18 13.7 inches of snow, 1893
Jan 19-20 Blizzard over southern New England killed 20 people.  Heavy surf and flood damage occurred, 1961. 12.3 inches of snow in Boston
Jan 21-22 Greatest 24 hour precipitation 3.25 inches, 1881
Jan 22 End of record tying 10 consecutive days at or above 32F, 1995
Jan 23 End of 13 consecutive days if measurable precipitation, 1995
Lowest pressure ever in January, 28.61 inches, 1987
Jan 23-24 12.4 inches of snow, 1935
Jan 24 All time lowest temperature for Jan., -13 degrees, 1882
Jan 24-25 Northeast gales and high tides create millions of dollars in beach property and shipping, 1905
12 inches of snow in Boston, 1941
Jan 26 All time highest temperature for Jan., 72F, 1950
Jan 27 Northeast gales and heavy snow in southern New England, 1897
Wind gust to 67 mph, 1996
Jan 28 14.7 inches of snow, 1897
Jan 26-29 Northeast gales and high tides create 2 million dollars in damage to beach property and shipping, 1933
Jan 28-29 Boston transportation crippled in 12.8 inches of snow and northeast gales, 1943
Jan 31 Highest pressure ever in January, 31.00 inches, 1920
Jan 31-Feb 1 14.3 inches of snow, 1898


NWS Public Information Statements
and Event Records for Significant Snow and Ice Storms
  • Jan. 01, 2003 ... MAP
    Event: Winter Storm
    Begin Date: 01 Jan 2003, 10:00:00 PM EST
    End Date: 02 Jan 2003, 04:00:00 AM EST
    Description:
    A low pressure area formed along a stationary front in the Ohio Valley, early on New Years Day. The storm deepened as it tracked northeastward, reaching east of Cape Cod shortly after midnight. This storm initially brought rain to the Berkshires. However, as a shallow arctic airmass slowly bled southward from a high in eastern Canada, the rain changed to freezing rain across the higher terrain, then the valley locations, by late New Year's Day. As the colder air became more entrenched, the precipitation gradually switched to sleet and finally to snow after midnight. Snowfall amounts were minor, only 1 to 4 inches. However, sleet and especially freezing rain, produced ice accretions up to one half inch thick. No unusual problems were reported to the National Weather Service in Albany with this storm.
  • Jan 2, 2004

  • Event: Heavy Snow
    Begin Date: 02 Jan 1996, 08:00:00 PM EST
    End Date: 03 Jan 1996, 08:00:00 PM EST
    Description:
    A major winter storm developed over the Gulf coast states on January 2nd and tracked northeast along the eastern seaboard during January 3rd. Heavy snow fell across Berkshire County Massachusetts with the average snowfall ranging from 10 to 12 inches.

    Same Storm: A strong low pressure system moved from Tennessee to the Virginia coast and then northeast off the New Jersey coast passing southeast of Cape Cod. This system produced heavy snow across the state, except along the south coast in extreme southern Plymouth and Bristol Counties and over Cape Cod and the Islands. Snowfall totals ranged from 8 to 12 inches. A small area of from 12 to 16 inches was reported in the southwest suburbs of Boston in the Milton-Randolph area. Also, in south-central Worcester County there was a small area that received 12 to 14 inches. The heaviest snow occurred during the early morning hours of the 3rd and made for a difficult commute, especially in the Boston area. The two busiest highways in the state were left poorly plowed at peak travel time. Most schools and some businesses were closed on the 3rd. Some final storm totals, which include light snow that fell late on the 3rd and during the early morning hours of the 4th are as follows: Boston, 13.1 inches; North Amherst, 11.9 inches; Westborough, 11 inches; Springfield, 8 inches; Fall River, 4 inches; New Bedford, 6 inches; Plymouth, 7 inches; and Provincetown, 1 inch.
  • Jan 2-3, 2006 ... MAP

  • Event: Record Warmth
    Begin Date: 03 Jan 1998, 01:20:00 PM EST
    Description:
    The temperature soared to a balmy maximum of 59 degrees at Blue Hill Observatory in Milton, setting a new record for the date. The old record was 58 degrees set in 1930.

    Event: Strong Winds, Heavy Rain, Freezing Rain, HIgh Wind
    Begin Date: 03 Jan 1999, 01:00:00 PM EST
    Description:
    A developing low pressure system moving from the mid Atlantic states into southern New England brought strong southeast winds and more than 2 inches of rain to eastern and southeastern Massachusetts. Freezing rain occurred in the central and western part of the state, especially in the valleys. Strong winds occurred across all of southeastern Massachusetts, including Cape Cod and the Islands. A peak wind gust to 71 mph was reported at Chatham, and a gust to 65 mph was reported at Onset, where two trees were blown down. In Fairhaven, a gust to 56 mph downed a telephone pole which resulted in a power outage, Other strong wind gusts included 56 mph at West Island, 55 mph at Nantucket and Pocasset, 48 mph at Martha's Vineyard, and 46 mph at Taunton and Plymouth. Heavy rainfall associated with the storm totaled 1.5 to 2.5 inches in less than 12 hours. As much as 2.25 inches fell in Walpole, 2.05 inches in Dedham and 2.00 inches in Norwood. 1.93 inches of rain fell at the Blue Hill Observatory in Milton, with as much as 0.8 inches in one hour. There were no reports of flooding. In central and western Massachusetts, temperatures remained below freezing, which resulted in a period of freezing rain. Glaze accumulations of up to one-half inch were reported from Chicopee and Russell in Hampden County, Hubbardston and Leicester in Worcester County, and from Shutesbury in Franklin County. The accumulation of ice downed branches and wires in West Springfield and Chicopee. Scattered power outages affected about 2,000 customers, including about 1,300 in Ludlow.
  • Jan. 03, 2003 ... MAP
    Event: Winter Storm
    Begin Date: 03 Jan 2003, 02:00:00 PM EST
    End Date: 04 Jan 2003, 11:00:00 AM EST
    Description:
    A powerful winter storm which tracked south of New England dumped heavy snow on western, central, and northeast Massachusetts and produced significant coastal flooding along the eastern Massachusetts coastline. As much as 1 to 2 feet of snow fell over a large area, from the east slopes of the Berkshires across Worcester County and into the Merrimack Valley and North Shore communities. Amounts tapered off dramatically from Boston to the South Shore, where only an inch or two of accumulation was reported before the snow changed to rain. Aside from scattered power outages and dozens of minor accidents, the heavy snow had little significant impact on the state, as most residents chose not to travel. Official storm totals include 14.0 inches at Worcester Airport, 5.0 inches at Blue Hill Observatory in Milton, 0.4 inch at Logan International Airport in Boston, and 0.2 inch at the National Weather Service office in Taunton. Other snowfall totals as reported by trained spotters include 24 inches in Chesterfield and Worthington; 21 inches in Ashfield; 17 inches in Goshen and Greenfield; 16 inches in Tolland, Towns
    End, and Haverhill; 12 inches in Westfield, North Amherst, Sterling, Shrewsbury, Hopkinton, Billerica, and Bradford; 10 inches in Whately, Wilbraham, Hopedale, Framingham, and Andover; and 8 inches in Douglas and Reading. The more significant impact of this storm was widespread coastal flooding. A high astronomical tide combined with 15-foot seas to cause flooding along most of the eastern Massachusetts coastline. In Marblehead, the downtown area was closed off after being flooded, and waves swept over the road to Marblehead Neck, shutting it down. The storm surge also shut down sections of Route 129, throwing mud, rock, and a section of boardwalk across the road. In Swampscott, a 60-foot section of sea wall along Blodgett Avenue collapsed, forcing the evacuation of several homes. The Nahant Causeway was closed for almost four hours due to flooding, cutting off access to the peninsula. Damage was most severe in Winthrop. Waves crashed over the sea wall protecting Point Shirley during the midday high tide, inundating streets with up to 5 feet of water and flooding scores of cars and basements. In all, about 50 homes were flooded. In Scituate, another hard hit area, about 40 houses along Turner Road were left without power. Residents estimated that 8 to 10 feet of water flooded Seventh Avenue, requiring evacuation. In Humarock, a narrow strip of land in Scituate that often gets the worst of coastal storms, residents used front-end loaders and backhoes to clear mud and rocks from Central Avenue. The road was closed with some sections flooded with several feet of water. Mounds of rocks, brought in by the tide, were piled as high as 10 feet along the side of the road. In all, as many as 10 roads in Scituate were fully or partly closed during high tide. In Marshfield, several feet of water flooded roads in Brant Rock and police blocked off Hewitt's Point and the esplanade for several hours. Waves crested over sea walls in Plymouth and left several areas submerged in 2 to 3 feet of water. A portion of Route 3A was flooded. Flooding was also reported on Cape Cod in Chatham, but was less severe than in other areas.

    Same Storm: A low pressure area developed in the Mississippi valley by late on January 2. The storm then tracked northward into the southern Ohio Valley, then rapidly redeveloped along the Mid Atlantic seaboard on January 3. Slowly, it moved to just east of Cape Cod by late on January 4. With plenty of cold air in place the stage was set for another snowstorm across the Berkshires. Although this storm was not as powerful as the Christmas Day storm, it moved very slowly and actually produced some heavier snowfall across Berkshire County. Light snow began falling early on the January 3, then it became heavier and steadier as the day wore on. A general one to two foot mantle of fresh snow was reported across the county. Dalton reported 13.9 inches and Savoy reported 23.2 Despite the heavy snow, no unusual problems were reported to the National Weather Service.

  • Event: High Winds
    Begin Date: 04 Jan 1994, 0830 EST
    Description:
    A strong low pressure system moving northeast off the Middle Atlantic coast toward Cape Cod caused heavy snow, a period of high winds, and some unprecedented changes in barometric pressure. This "nor'easter" caused snow accumulations of more than one inch per hour during the pre-dawn hours. The precipitation then mixed with or changed to sleet in many locations. Some snowfall amounts included: Boston, 8.7 inches; Blue Hill Observatory, Milton, 9 inches; Brockton, 7 inches; Stoneham, 11 inches; Worcester, 10.1 inches. Snowfall over western Massachusetts ranged up to 8 to 12 inches at the higher elevations. In the Connecticut River valley, amounts of around six inches were reported. The heavy snow resulted in difficult travel conditions and closure of schools. Strong winds in the Berkshires resulted in the closure of a number of ski lifts. At Boston's Logan International Airport, a wind gust to 66 mph from the northeast accompanied a very unusual barometric pressure fluctuation known as a "gravity wave." At Blue Hill Observatory in Milton, the pressure dropped 9 millibars (0.27 inches) in just eight minutes shortly before 10 AM with a wind gust to 60 mph from the northeast! Wind damage from this event was reported in New Bedford, where a large door on a commercial building was damaged at an estimated cost of $50,000.

    Event: Strong Wind
    Begin Date: 04 Jan 2000, 02:00:00 PM EST
    End Date: 04 Jan 2000, 10:00:00 PM EST
    Description:
    Strong southerly winds buffeted eastern Massachusetts as low pressure passed west of the state. Sustained winds of 25 to 35 mph were observed with gusts as high as 50 mph. The strong wind gusts downed large branches in Dartmouth, and downed telephone wires in Westport. No other damage was reported.
  • Jan 4-5, 2004
  • Jan. 5, 2001
  • Jan 05-06, 2005
    Event: Winter Storm
    Begin Date: 05 Jan 2005, 09:00:00 AM EST
    End Date: 06 Jan 2005, 09:00:00 PM EST Forecast
    Description:
    Strengthening low pressure tracking southeast of Nantucket brought heavy snow to most of Massachusetts along and outside the Interstate 95 corridor. Snowfall totals of 4 to 8 inches were widely observed from greater Boston to the Worcester Hills and east slopes of the Berkshires. Official snowfall totals included 9.2 inches at Worcester Airport, 6.9 inches at Logan International Airport in Boston, and 6.4 inches at the National Weather Service office in Taunton and at Blue Hill Observatory in Milton. Other snowfall totals, as reported by trained spotters, included 9 inches in Goshen and Southwick; 8 inches in Westhampton, and West Holyoke; and 6 inches in Greenfield, Sunderland, Chicopee, Wilbraham, Easthampton, West Brookfield, Foxboro, and Norton.
  • Jan. 6, 1999

  • Event: Winter Storm
    Begin Date: 06 Jan 2005, 06:00:00 AM EST
    End Date: 06 Jan 2005, 04:00:00 PM EST
    Description:
    Snowfall total depths ranged from 5 to 8 inches, with minor sleet accumulations, as well.
  • Jan. 6, 2002 ... MAP
  • Jan. 7, 2002 ... MAP
    Event: Heavy Snow
    Begin Date: 06 Jan 2002, 09:00:00 PM EST
    End Date: 07 Jan 2002, 04:00:00 AM EST
    Description:
    Low pressure moving from the Carolinas to southeast New England brought heavy snow to the higher terrain of Franklin and western Hampshire Counties. Snowfall totals ranged from 6 to 8 inches.

    Same Storm: A compact low pressure area developed across the Gulf States on Sunday January 6th. This storm loaded up with Gulf of Mexico moisture then swiftly tracked up along the Atlantic seaboard, and was already in the Gulf of Maine by Monday morning. The upper level support to this system moved across the region during the day Monday and brought another round of lighter snow. The two systems brought a 6-12 inch swath of snow to northern Berkshire County , while areas to the south of Interstate 90 had less than 7 inches. 8.3 inches of snowfall accumulated at Savoy. No serious problems were reported from Berkshire County to the National Weather Service regarding this storm.

  • Event: Heavy Snow
    Begin Date: 07 Jan 1994, 0800 EST
    End Date: 07 Jan 1994, 1200 EST
    Description:
    A prolonged period of snow, which started late on January 6th, became heavy around noon on the 7th, and continued into the morning of the 8th, produced snowfall totals of from 13 to 18 inches along and north of the Massachusetts Turnpike. Even Cape Cod and the Islands received six inches of snow before precipitation turned to rain on the evening of January 7th. Snow changed briefly to rain over southeastern Massachusetts as far north as Boston during the morning of January 8th as temperatures rose to the upper 30s before falling quickly back to the 20s and teens, causing a quick freeze. The fast drop in temperature resulted in very poor road conditions when snow and slush froze quite suddenly. Road crews struggled to remove it. This was the third major snowstorm in a ten day period for much of the state. The National Weather Service at Boston received 16.2 inches of snow for a 10-day total of 35 inches. In addition, total snow depth on the ground reached 20 inches. This was the greatest snow depth ever recorded so early in the season. Other total amounts included: Worcester, 13 inches; Amesbury, 10 inches; Taunton, 7.9 inches; Westfield, 14.5 inches; North Amherst, 16 inches; E. Otis, 15 inches. Several days after the storm, the roof of a supermarket in Agawam caved in under the weight of the heavy snow.

    Event: High Winds
    Begin Date: 07 Jan 1995, 0430 EST
    Description:
    A rapidly intensifying low pressure system near New York City moving northeast into central Massachusetts produced strong and very gusty south winds. Some peak wind gusts reported included: Nantucket and Falmouth, 58 mph; Buzzards Bay buoy, 54 mph; Blue Hill Observatory, Milton, 68 mph; and Stoneham, 56 mph. There were no reports of damage.

    Event: Heavy Snow
    Begin Date: 07 Jan 1996, 02:00:00 PM EST
    End Date: 08 Jan 1996, 06:00:00 PM EST
    Description:
    An intense winter storm formed off the coast of South Carolina on January 7th. The system moved northeast along the east coast on Monday January 8th and into Nova Scotia by the 9th. Heavy snow fell across Berkshire County Massachusetts causing many power outages and several roofs to collapse. Some specific snowfall amounts included 32 inches in Great Barrington and 24 inches in Pittsfield.

    Same Storm: An intense East Coast low pressure system moved northeast from eastern Georgia passing along the coast of the Carolinas and then close to 40 degrees North and 70 degrees West. This storm was one of the most significant winter storms to hit southern New England in the past 20 years and was named "The Blizzard of '96" as it dumped record snowfalls from the mid-Atlantic states to southern New England. Technically, this storm only reached a true blizzard by National Weather Service criteria for a few hours in a small section of eastern Massachusetts around South Weymouth during the early morning hours on January 8th. Very heavy snowfall, which was measured in feet, was the main effect of this storm. It was the most region-wide heavy snowfall since the "Blizzard of '78." Totals ranged from 15 to 25 inches, with many totals of 20 to 25 inches in parts of Plymouth and Bristol Counties. Totals of 13 to 18 inches were reported from Cape Cod and the Islands. There was a brief change to rain on parts of the Cape. More than 20 inches were reported in parts of Hampden and Hampshire Counties of western Massachusetts with more than 30 inches in some places in the Berkshires. Snowfall from this storm totalled 18 inches at Boston and the total snow depth on the ground hit 30 inches, breaking the all-time record of 29 inches set at the End of the "Blizzard of '78." Strong to gale force northeast winds along the coast threatened to bring coastal flooding, but a wind shift to the north and parallel to the Massachusetts east coast resulted in a decreasing storm surge from around 2.7 feet to 1.9 feet at the Boston tide gauge by the time of the early afternoon high tide on January 8th. Only a few coastal roads were closed due to flooding. However, on the eastern shore of Nantucket Island, high waves and stronger than usual ocean currents eroded sand dunes and did an estimated $200,000 damage to cottages in an area that suffered damage from previous nor'easters. A building inspector on Nantucket stated that the Gulf Stream had been displaced farther to the north than usual and that greater sea surface temperature differences caused faster currents along the shore. The main impact of this storm, though, was the closure of schools, businesses, airports, and transportation systems for a long duration. The Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency reported damage claims of $32 million from approximately 350 communities, mostly for the costs of snow removal (see damage figures above). The combination of this snowfall, earlier snowfalls, and subsequent rainfall events resulted in the collapse of many roofs within a week to two weeks after the storm. In Whitman, a section of a skating rink roof collapsed, injuring four women. In Foxborough, on January 12th, after several more inches of snow and then some heavy rain, a roof collapsed at one of the water department buildings. On January 13th, a woman was evacuated from her mobile home in Marlborough after the roof collapsed. More than 70 people were evacuated from a condominium in Framingham after the roof cracked and then caved in. In Franklin, a house suffered structural damage from the weight of the snow, while in Townsend a barn roof collapsed killing 8 dairy cows. Other roof collapses were reported at a church in Chelmsford, a business in Tyngsborough, and at a mall in Tewksbury. On January 14th, the roof of a two-story house collapsed in West Springfield, resulting in an estimated $150,000 damage to the structure. The roof of a garage in Northampton collapsed. The building was reported to be a total loss. In Monson, a barn roof collapsed. A number of people were injured when they fell while clearing snow from their roofs. On January 19th, the roof of a barn collapsed in Framingham, killing two horses.

    Event: Heavy Snow
    Begin Date: 08 Jan 1994, 0600 EST
    Description:
    A prolonged period of snow, which started late on January 6th, became heavy around noon on the 7th, and continued into the morning of the 8th, produced snowfall totals of from 13 to 18 inches along and north of the Massachusetts Turnpike. Even Cape Cod and the Islands received six inches of snow before precipitation turned to rain on the evening of January 7th. Snow changed briefly to rain over southeastern Massachusetts as far north as Boston during the morning of January 8th as temperatures rose to the upper 30s before falling quickly back to the 20s and teens, causing a quick freeze. The fast drop in temperature resulted in very poor road conditions when snow and slush froze quite suddenly. Road crews struggled to remove it. This was the third major snowstorm in a ten day period for much of the state. The National Weather Service at Boston received 16.2 inches of snow for a 10-day total of 35 inches. In addition, total snow depth on the ground reached 20 inches. This was the greatest snow depth ever recorded so early in the season. Other total amounts included: Worcester, 13 inches; Amesbury, 10 inches; Taunton, 7.9 inches; Westfield, 14.5 inches; North Amherst, 16 inches; E. Otis, 15 inches. Several days after the storm, the roof of a supermarket in Agawam caved in under the weight of the heavy snow.
  • Jan. 8, 1999
  • Jan 08, 2005
    Event: Winter Storm
    Begin Date: 08 Jan 2005, 07:00:00 AM EST
    End Date: 08 Jan 2005, 07:00:00 PM EST
    Description:
    Low pressure quickly strengthened as it passed south of New England and brought a mix of snow, sleet and freezing rain to much of interior southern New England. The Merrimack Valley was especially hard hit, where a combination of 4 to 7 inches of snow and around one quarter inch of icing brought down tree limbs and power lines, with scattered power outages. Of more significance were the dozens of accidents reported as a result of slippery roads, including a 6-car pileup on Interstate 84 in Sturbridge.
  • Jan. 9, 2001
  • Jan. 09, 2003

  • Event: Flood, Ice Storm
    Begin Date: 09 Jan 1998, 12:00:00 PM EST
    End Date: 11 Jan 1998, 11:00:00 AM EST
    Description:
    The combination of a significant rain event and melting snow caused by mild temperatures resulted in a minor river flood episode along the Connecticut River, At Montague City, the Connecticut River reached flood stage of 28 feet at noon on January 9th, crested at 28.82 feet at 8 PM the same day, then dropped below flood stage at 3 AM on January 10th. At Northampton, the Connecticut River reached flood stage of 112.0 feet at 6 PM on January 9th, crested at 113.0 feet at 7 AM on the 10th, then dropped below flood stage at 11 AM on January 11th.
    Same Storm: Spotty areas of freezing rain fell in parts of northern Worcester County and extreme northwest Middlesex County. In a few places. there was severe icing. The icing was confined to specific elevations. A state of emergency was declared in the town of Paxton, where ice accretion brought down many tree limbs and wires causing road closures and power outages. Similar problems were reported in Leicester, Ashby, and Westminster. Power outages affected several hundred customers. There were scattered areas of icing in other towns, but no damage was reported.

    Event: Snow Squall
    Begin Date: 10 Jan 1997, 04:30:00 PM EST
    End Date: 10 Jan 1997, 05:30:00 PM EST
    Description:
    A sudden snow squall, accompanied by thunder, hit parts of northern Worcester County and the Merrimack Valley just as the sun was setting and deposited a quick one to two inches of snow. In Leominster, police closed a three-mile section of Route 2 for 45 minutes as the sudden snow accumulation made the highway extremely icy and resulted in dozens of accidents. In the greater Lowell area, the late afternoon commute quickly became a grid-lock due to dozens of skidding accidents as roads became very slippery. Cars were at a standstill due to spinning tires unable to grip the icy road surfaces. The traffic jams lasted for several hours.

    Same Storm: A combination of a new-moon high tide and southeast winds that became southwest and gusting to 40 to 55 mph resulted in a storm tidal surge which reached 2 to 4 feet in Buzzards Bay and Mount Hope Bay. Some peak wind gusts included: 55 mph at Pocasset; 47 mph on West Island, Fairhaven; and 44 mph at Fall River. Numerous roads, yards, and cellars were flooded in low-lying waterfront areas. All communities from Wareham to Fall River and Westport along the south coast reported flooding. The most affected areas were along the waterfronts of Marion, Mattapoisett, Fairhaven, and Dartmouth. In Marion, water was reported 4 feet above high tide. Some local residents said this was the highest coastal flooding they had seen outside of a hurricane. This was the worst flooding since Hurricane Bob in 1991. There is the possibility that a "gravity wave" (which results in rapid changes in wind and atmospheric pressure fields) may have played a part in this sudden and unexpected coastal flooding event. Several small streams that empty into Mount Hope Bay rose up 3 feet out of their banks. Flooding occurred in several Bristol County towns. The Taunton and Assonet Rivers overflowed onto a few streets in Berkley as reported by local police. In Somerset, a beach entrance and a bridge were closed. Overall, the flooding was considered minor with no structural damage or road washouts.

    Same Storm: A combination of a new-moon high tide and southeast winds that became southwest and gusting to 40 to 55 mph resulted in a storm tidal surge which reached 2 to 4 feet in Buzzards Bay and Mount Hope Bay. Some peak wind gusts included: 55 mph at Pocasset; 47 mph on West Island, Fairhaven; and 44 mph at Fall River. Numerous roads, yards, and cellars were flooded in low-lying waterfront areas. All communities from Wareham to Fall River and Westport along the south coast reported flooding. The most affected areas were along the waterfronts of Marion, Mattapoisett, Fairhaven, and Dartmouth. In Marion, water was reported 4 feet above high tide. Some local residents said this was the highest coastal flooding they had seen outside of a hurricane. This was the worst flooding since Hurricane Bob in 1991. There is the possibility that a "gravity wave" (which results in rapid changes in wind and atmospheric pressure fields) may have played a part in this sudden and unexpected coastal flooding event. Several small streams that empty into Mount Hope Bay rose up 3 feet out of their banks. Flooding occurred in several Bristol County towns. The Taunton and Assonet Rivers overflowed onto a few streets in Berkley as reported by local police. In Somerset, a beach entrance and a bridge were closed. Overall, the flooding was considered minor with no structural damage or road washouts.

    Event: Strong Wind
    Begin Date: 10 Jan 2000, 06:00:00 PM EST
    End Date: 10 Jan 2000, 10:00:00 PM EST
    Description:
    A brief period of strong southerly winds occurred in eastern Massachusetts, as a developing low pressure system tracked from Worcester to Portsmouth New Hampshire. Sustained winds near 35 mph were common, with gusts as high as 50 mph. No damage was reported.

    Event: Heavy Snow
    Begin Date: 10 Jan 1996, 12:00:00 AM EST
    End Date: 10 Jan 1996, 10:00:00 PM EST
    Description:
    Snowfall accumulations of 4 to 8 inches were reported across the eastern portion of the state, including Cape Cod. This snowfall, although it was of the fluffy variety, added to the headaches of snow removal crews which were still clearing away up to two feet of snow left by the "Blizzard of '96" just two days earlier. Snow on the ground reach two to three feet and all communities, especially cities, had many problems keeping residential streets passable. Boston had 5.4 inches and the snow on the ground total set a new record of 32 inches at noon on January 10th. The old record was 29 inches on February 7, 1978. Maynard and Billerica both had 6 inches from this event and the total depth on the ground reached 35 inches at Maynard. At Hingham, the snowfall totalled 6 inches and the depth on the ground reached 32 inches, beating a record of 31 inches set on February 7, 1978. Even at Plymouth, where 7 inches of snow fell, the total snow depth reached 28 inches. On Cape Cod, Barnstable reported the maximum snowfall from this event of 9 inches, while Eastham had 8 inches. On Martha's Vineyard, there was 4 inches at Vineyard haven. In northeast Massachusetts, Newbury had 9 inches and Gloucester had 8 inches. Southwest of Boston, West Medway reported 7 inches.

    Event: Snow Squall
    Begin Date: 10 Jan 1997, 04:30:00 PM EST
    End Date: 10 Jan 1997, 05:30:00 PM EST
    Description:
    A sudden snow squall, accompanied by thunder, hit parts of northern Worcester County and the Merrimack Valley just as the sun was setting and deposited a quick one to two inches of snow. In Leominster, police closed a three-mile section of Route 2 for 45 minutes as the sudden snow accumulation made the highway extremely icy and resulted in dozens of accidents. In the greater Lowell area, the late afternoon commute quickly became a grid-lock due to dozens of skidding accidents as roads became very slippery. Cars were at a standstill due to spinning tires unable to grip the icy road surfaces. The traffic jams lasted for several hours.

    Same Storm: A combination of a new-moon high tide and southeast winds that became southwest and gusting to 40 to 55 mph resulted in a storm tidal surge which reached 2 to 4 feet in Buzzards Bay and Mount Hope Bay. Some peak wind gusts included: 55 mph at Pocasset; 47 mph on West Island, Fairhaven; and 44 mph at Fall River. Numerous roads, yards, and cellars were flooded in low-lying waterfront areas. All communities from Wareham to Fall River and Westport along the south coast reported flooding. The most affected areas were along the waterfronts of Marion, Mattapoisett, Fairhaven, and Dartmouth. In Marion, water was reported 4 feet above high tide. Some local residents said this was the highest coastal flooding they had seen outside of a hurricane. This was the worst flooding since Hurricane Bob in 1991. There is the possibility that a "gravity wave" (which results in rapid changes in wind and atmospheric pressure fields) may have played a part in this sudden and unexpected coastal flooding event. Several small streams that empty into Mount Hope Bay rose up 3 feet out of their banks. Flooding occurred in several Bristol County towns. The Taunton and Assonet Rivers overflowed onto a few streets in Berkley as reported by local police. In Somerset, a beach entrance and a bridge were closed. Overall, the flooding was considered minor with no structural damage or road washouts.

    Same Storm: A combination of a new-moon high tide and southeast winds that became southwest and gusting to 40 to 55 mph resulted in a storm tidal surge which reached 2 to 4 feet in Buzzards Bay and Mount Hope Bay. Some peak wind gusts included: 55 mph at Pocasset; 47 mph on West Island, Fairhaven; and 44 mph at Fall River. Numerous roads, yards, and cellars were flooded in low-lying waterfront areas. All communities from Wareham to Fall River and Westport along the south coast reported flooding. The most affected areas were along the waterfronts of Marion, Mattapoisett, Fairhaven, and Dartmouth. In Marion, water was reported 4 feet above high tide. Some local residents said this was the highest coastal flooding they had seen outside of a hurricane. This was the worst flooding since Hurricane Bob in 1991. There is the possibility that a "gravity wave" (which results in rapid changes in wind and atmospheric pressure fields) may have played a part in this sudden and unexpected coastal flooding event. Several small streams that empty into Mount Hope Bay rose up 3 feet out of their banks. Flooding occurred in several Bristol County towns. The Taunton and Assonet Rivers overflowed onto a few streets in Berkley as reported by local police. In Somerset, a beach entrance and a bridge were closed. Overall, the flooding was considered minor with no structural damage or road washouts.
  • Jan 11-12, 2005

  • Event: Heavy Snow
    Begin Date: 12 Jan 1996, 02:00:00 PM EST
    End Date: 12 Jan 1996, 11:00:00 PM EST
    Description:
    An intensifying low pressure system moved northeast from the mid-Atlantic coast with its center passing across southeast Massachusetts into Cape Cod Bay near Plymouth around 11 PM on the 12th. This storm brought still another in a seemingly
    Endless series of heavy snowfall events. Snowfall totals from 6 to 8 inches were reported from the slopes of the Berkshires east across central Massachusetts and then northeast across Middlesex and Essex Counties. Somewhat higher totals were reported from the higher elevations of the eastern Berkshire Hills with 10 inches at Ashfield and Worthington. Along the coast and in the southeast part of the state, snow quickly turned to heavy rain after a trace to only a couple of inches accumulation.

    Event: Heavy Snow
    Begin Date: 11 Jan 1997, 05:00:00 AM EST
    End Date: 11 Jan 1997, 01:00:00 PM EST
    Description:
    A developing low pressure system south of Long Island spread bands of heavy snow across southeastern Massachusetts, Cape Cod, and the Islands. Six to nine inches of snow fell from just south of Boston to northern Rhode Island and southeastward to Cape Cod. This was a quick-hitting storm with snow accumulation rates up to 2 inches per hour. Most of the snowfall occurred during a 6-hour period. Some snowfall amounts included: Cohasset, 9.5 inches; Norwell, 9 inches; Taunton, 8.6 inches; Hingham and Blue Hill in Milton, both 8.0 inches; North Quincy, Norwood, and Stoughton, 7 inches; Attleboro, 6.5 inches; West Dennis, 6.3 inches; and Yarmouth, Acushnet, and New Bedford, 6 inches. Numerous minor traffic accidents were reported. An 18-car pile-up forced police to close Route 3 in Braintree for about 20 minutes. In another chain reaction collision, another 18-car pile-up on Route 3 in Duxbury closed the highway for 45 minutes. A 10-car collision closed a section of Interstate 95 near Dedham at 7 AM.

    Event: Strong Wind
    Begin Date: 12 Jan 2000, 12:00:00 PM EST
    End Date: 12 Jan 2000, 04:00:00 PM EST
    Description:
    Gusty northwest winds buffeted much of the Bay State as high pressure built into the region from Canada. The strongest winds were felt across central Massachusetts, and also on Cape Cod and Nantucket, where sustained winds averaged 25 to 35 mph and peak gusts reached as high as 49 mph at Worcester Regional Airport. The strong winds downed two trees in Northampton, including one 60-foot hemlock tree which fell onto a house, dislodging the chimney but causing no other damage. No injuries were reported.
  • Jan 12, 2004

  • Event: Heavy Snow
    Begin Date: 12 Jan 1996, 12:00:00 PM EST
    End Date: 13 Jan 1996, 03:00:00 AM EST
    Description:
    A winter storm formed off the coast of North Carolina on January 12th and moved northeast along the coast through January 13th. Heavy snow fell across Berkshire County Massachusetts with snowfall totals ranging from 6 to 10 inches.

    Event: Heavy Snow
    Begin Date: 13 Jan 1993, 0400 EST
    Description:
    Two periods of snow fell across the western portion of the state leaving snow totals of six to ten inches. Each snowfall lasted several hours. The first started during the early morning hours and the second during the late afternoon. Thunder accompanied the second snowfall in parts of the Connecticut Valley. Some totals included: Florida 10 inches, North Adams 8.50 inches and Pittsfield 8.00 inches.

    Same Storm: Two periods of snow fell across the central and eastern portion of the state with totals reaching six to eight inches in many places. The first period of snow started around 6 a.m. and lasted several hours coinciding with the morning rush hour. Slippery roads resulted in numerous skidding accidents. The second snowfall started during the early evening and lasted into the early morning hours the next day. Some totals included: Newburyport and Dracut 9.00 inches each, Worcester 8.20 inches, Westboro 8.00 inches, Boston and Blue Hill 7.30 inches, Framingham 7.00 inches and Peabody 6.00 inches.
  • Jan. 13, 2000 ... MAP
    Event: Snow
    Begin Date: 13 Jan 2000, 06:00:00 AM EST
    End Date: 13 Jan 2000, 06:00:00 PM EST
    Description:
    Low pressure passing just south of the Cape and Islands brought the first widespread snowfall of the winter season to the Bay State, and brought heavy snow to much of central Massachusetts. Accumulating snow was reported down to the south coast. The snow
    Ended the stretch of more than 300 days without measurable snowfall in Boston. The last time snow had fallen at Logan International Airport was on March 15, 1999. It began snowing during the morning rush hour, causing roadways to quickly become iced over. State Police handled more than 100 car accidents in Greater Boston alone between 7 and 9 am. Accumulations ranged from 1 to 3 inches on the south coast to 3 to 6 inches as far north as the Mass Pike. Greater Boston received 4 to 6 inches of snow, with as much as 7 to 9 inches in northern Worcester County. The storm was followed by a bitterly cold airmass, which brought subzero wind chills to the region.

  • Event: Heavy Snow
    Begin Date: 12 Jan 1995, 0500 EST
    Description:
    Cold northeast winds resulted in "ocean effect" snow. Locally heavy snowfall occurred in a few east coastal Massachusetts towns, both north and south of Boston. On the North Shore, Manchester (By-the-Sea) received 10 inches. On the South Shore, Hingham had seven inches. The snowfall tapered to only a few inches several miles inland.

    Event: Record Warmth
    Begin Date: 13 Jan 1995, 1200 EST
    End Date: 16 Jan 1995, 1800EST EST
    Description:
    An unusually long spell of very mild mid-winter weather set new records. New daily high temperature records were set at the Blue Hill Observatory in Milton on three consecutive days. On January 14th, the maximum temperature of 65 degrees set a new record for the date and equaled the second highest temperature on record for the month of January. On January 15th and 16th, the maximum temperatures of 64 and 63 degrees (respectively) both were records for the date. The minimum temperatures of 54 and 55 degrees (on the 15th and 16th) both set new high minimum temperature records for the date and even for the month of January. Even more extraordinary was the mean temperature of 59 degrees for both days, making January 15th and 16th the two warmest days of records for any January. |At Boston, the maximum temperature of 66 degrees set a record for January 15th, as did the high temperature of 64 degrees recorded for January 16th. The combination of a record high maximum and a tied high minimum temperature made January 15th the warmest on record with a mean temperature of 57 degrees. Nighttime low temperatures remained well above freezing throughout the period.
  • Jan. 13, 2002 ... MAP

  • Event: High Wind
    Begin Date: 14 Jan 2005, 03:00:00 AM EST
    End Date: 14 Jan 2005, 04:00:00 AM EST
    End Location: Not Known

    Magnitude: 52 knots
    Description:
    Strong south winds affected much of eastern Massachusetts ahead of a strong cold front. A wind gust to 60 mph was reported at the Blue Hill Observatory in Milton, with sustained winds of 40 mph.
  • Jan. 13, 1999
    Event: Winter Storm
    Begin Date: 14 Jan 1999, 06:00:00 AM EST
    End Date: 15 Jan 1999, 02:00:00 PM EST
    Description:
    An extremely cold arctic air mass moved into western Massachusetts on January 13 and January 14. At the same time an area of low pressure developed over Kentucky. This low moved east to northern Virgina then turned north and moved up the Hudson Valley of New York on January 15. The storm brought a significant amount of snow sleet and freezing rain to the region with total melted precipitation exceeding half an inch in the Berkshires.

    Same Storm: A strong high pressure system centered over southeast Canada brought an Arctic airmass into Massachusetts. Northeast winds off the warmer waters of the Atlantic Ocean produced "ocean effect" snow squalls along the eastern coast from Essex County to Plymouth County. During the same time, an intensifying low pressure system over the mid Atlantic states brought a more general snowfall across the state. The highest snowfall totals were found in two areas - in coastal northeast Massachusetts and in Boston's southern suburbs, which both received enhancement from the "ocean effect" snow. Total snowfall in these areas ranged from 10 to 16 inches, with as much as 16.5 inches in South Weymouth. The heavy snow in the Boston area created havoc with the afternoon and evening rush hour. Many drivers abandoned their vehicles on a section of the Southeast Expressway in Quincy, and also along most of Route 128. Portions of both of these roadways had to be closed until snowplows could keep up with the snow, which was falling at the rate of around 2 inches per hour . It took evening commuters as long as 3 to 4 hours just to drive 10 to 15 miles. Schools were closed in Greater Boston for one to two days as a result of this storm. Those areas which did not receive the enhancement from the ocean, namely western and central Massachusetts, and eastern Massachusetts outside of the Interstate 495 corridor, received somewhat lower amounts. About 6 to 9 inches fell across the remainder of eastern Massachusetts. Only one or two locations in western Massachusetts reported 6 to 8 inches of snow, both of which were in Franklin County.

  • Event: Strong Winds, Heavy Rain, Freezing Rain
    Begin Date: 15 Jan 1999, 09:00:00 AM EST
    Description:
    Rainfall of 1 to 2 inches combined with rapid snowmelt to result in considerable urban street flooding and ponding of water in low lying areas. There were also many reports of basement flooding. The problem was aggravated by storm drains which became clogged by snow and ice. Temperatures rose rapidly from the 20's and 30's into the 40's and 50's, which melted much of the 8 to 15 inches of snow which was on the ground. Scattered thunderstorms also accompanied the heavy rain. In southeastern Massachusetts, strong southeast winds of 40 to 50 mph were also reported. The most severe street flooding occurred in Greater Boston, where many cars were submerged or stalled in low lying areas. In Boston, the Callahan Tunnel flooded, stranding several vehicles. Several cars were submerged in flood waters when underpasses on Route 128 in Dedham and Needham flooded out. No injuries were reported.
    Same Storm: Snow changed to freezing rain across northern Massachusetts, from Franklin County to Worcester, Middlesex, and Essex Counties during the early morning hours. Glaze accumulated from one quarter to one half inch. Scattered power outages were reported when the buildup of ice knocked down branches onto power lines. As much as 2,500 customers lost power in Clinton, and another 700 lost power in Lynn. Other outages were reported in Burlington and Sudbury.
  • Jan 14-15, 2006 ... MAP
  • Jan. 15, 2001

  • Event: Cold
    Begin Date: 15 Jan 1994, 1800 EST
    End Date: 16 Jan 1994, 1800EST EST
    Description:
    A Siberian air mass invaded New England and brought record to near-record low temperatures. Strong northwest winds accompanied the cold and drove wind chill indices to extremely low values from 30 to 50 below zero. At the highest elevations, wind chills dropped to 60 to 70 below zero. The National Weather Service at 1,000-foot high Worcester Municipal Airport recorded a record-breaking minimum temperature of -12 degrees and a wind chill as low as -68 degrees shortly after daybreak on January 16th! Other low temperatures were: Boston, -4 degrees; Blue Hill, Milton, -9 degrees; N. Amherst, -18 degrees; Pittsfield, -16 degrees; Hingham, -6 degrees; and Chatham -1 degree. Also, on January 16th, Boston recorded its first below zero reading in more than six years. Boston's record low maximum temperature of only 7 degrees and Blue Hill's record low maximum temperature of 4 degrees both were the lowest maximum temperatures in 26 years. The mean temperature of 2 degrees at Boston and -3 degrees at Blue Hill made it the coldest day since January 8, 1968. A very tragic death can be attributed to exposure to the extreme cold in Worcester, where a 69 year old woman died on a neighbor's doorstep after her cries for help went unanswered. Three people were treated for exposure at a hospital in Gardner.
  • Jan. 16, 1998
    Event: Ice Storm
    Begin Date: 15 Jan 1998, 06:00:00 PM EST
    End Date: 16 Jan 1998, 12:00:00 PM EST
    Description:
    Low pressure moved from the southeastern United States to a position off the Mid-Atlantic coast. Heavy snow and a pocket of freezing rain affected much of the state. A moderate ice storm occurred across much of Hampden County. The maximum ice accretion reported was 5/8 inch in Agawam. A few scattered power outages were reported. Heavy snow occurred across Massachusetts from Norfolk, Suffolk, Essex, and Middlesex Counties in the Greater Boston area west and northwest across Worcester and Franklin Counties. Maximum snowfall totals reached 10 inches in parts of Middlesex and Worcester Counties. Some totals included: Princeton, 10 inches; Sudbury and Clinton, 9.5 inches; Shrewsbury, 9.0 inches; Worcester, 8.8 inches; Westboro, 8.4 inches; Rowe, Shelburne, and Bernardston, 8.0 inches; and Blue Hill, in Milton, 7.0 inches. Boston's Logan International Airport had 3.5 inches. This storm resulted in many school closings and a difficult Friday morning commute and poor driving conditions in the heavy snow and freezing rain areas.

    Same Storm: On January 15 and 16, a winter storm moved from the southeast Atlantic coast north to the southern New Jersey coast and then out to sea. This storm produced two to six inches of snow across Berkshire County, followed by significant accumulations of sleet and freezing rain.
  • Jan 14-15, 2004
    Event: Extreme Cold/wind Chill
    Begin Date: 15 Jan 2004, 07:00:00 PM EST
    End Date: 16 Jan 2004, 11:00:00 AM EST
    Description:
    An extremely cold air mass moved out of Siberia, then plunged southward through Canada and across the northeast by January 15. At the same time, a powerful storm developed off the Canadian Maritimes. The pressure gradient between the intense storm and the arctic high pressure, ext
    Ending from central Canada southward through the Ohio Valley, produced gusty north to northwest winds in the 15 to 30 mph range, with higher gusts. This wind, combined with ambient temperatures ranging from zero to 10 below zero, resulted in dangerous wind chills across Berkshire County during the night of January 15 through the morning of the 16th. Equivalent wind chill readings ranged from 30 to 40 below zero.

  • Event: High Wind
    Begin Date: 16 Jan 1997, 12:53:00 PM EST
    End Date: 16 Jan 1997, 12:53:00 PM EST
    Magnitude: 56 knots
    Description:
    A peak gust to 65 mph from the south was recorded at the Blue Hill Observatory in Milton at an elevation of 670 feet above sea level.

    Event: Strong Wind
    Begin Date: 16 Jan 2000, 05:00:00 PM EST
    End Date: 17 Jan 2000, 12:00:00 PM EST
    Description:
    An intensifying low pressure system in the Gulf of Maine brought strong northwest winds and bitterly cold wind chills to Massachusetts. The strongest winds were felt in the eastern third of the state, as well as some of the higher elevations in the west. Sustained winds of 25 to 35 mph were common, with gusts near 50 mph. No wind damage was reported.
  • Jan 16-17, 2005

  • Event: Heavy Snow Squalls
    Begin Date: 17 Jan 1997, 08:00:00 PM EST
    End Date: 18 Jan 1997, 07:00:00 AM EST
    Description:
    Six to eight inches of "ocean-effect" snow fell across Nantucket Island as west-southwest winds transported Arctic air across the relatively warmer ocean waters. Several inches of snow also fell on the nearby island of Martha's Vineyard.

    Same Storm: The Blue Hill Observatory recorded a peak wind gust of 60 mph from the west-northwest.

    Same Storm: The Littleton Fire Department reported winds of 55 mph with a peak gust to 75 mph. Tree limbs were blown down and there were scattered power outages. The strong west winds accompanied the arrival of an Arctic airmass.

    Same Storm: Strong west-northwest winds blew several sections of siding from a house in Lynnfield.

    Event: Heavy Snow
    Begin Date: 17 Jan 1994, 0400 EST
    End Date: 18 Jan 1994, 0200EST EST
    Description:
    Up to 10 to 15 inches of snow fell across Berkshire County. The precipitation was a wintry mix.

    Event: Extreme Cold
    Begin Date: 17 Jan 2000, 03:00:00 AM EST
    End Date: 17 Jan 2000, 12:00:00 PM EST
    Description:
    A very large arctic high built southward from eastern Canada early on January 17. At the same, deep low pressure system settled in over the Canadian Maritimes. A strong pressure gradient developed between these two features resulting a northwest wind averaging between 15 and 30 miles an hour across the Berkshires. At the same time, temperatures plummeted to between zero and 10 below. The combination of the very low temperatures and the strong wind, produced dangerously low wind chill values in the 50 to 60 below zero range. The dangerous wind chills persisted well into the midday hours despite bright sunshine.
  • Jan. 17, 2002
  • Jan. 17-18, 2003
  • Jan 18, 2004

  • Event: Freezing Rain and Strong Winds
    Begin Date: 18 Jan 1999, 06:30:00 AM EST
    End Date: 18 Jan 1999, 03:00:00 PM EST
    Description:
    Low pressure moving northward into Canada brought a variety of weather to Massachusetts, including freezing rain, high wind, and scattered thunderstorms. Freezing rain in western Massachusetts caused severe icing of roadways, especially in the valleys of Franklin, Hampshire, and Hampden Counties. Many towns reported states of emergency. Roads were closed in many communities, including Goshen, Northfield, Colrain, Florida, Heath, Cummington, Chester, Gill, Huntington, and Russell. Thunderstorms accompanied the freezing rain during the afternoon. Strong south winds occurred ahead of an approaching cold front, mainly in the eastern part of the state, but also across the higher elevations of western and central Massachusetts. Gusts as high as 45 to 55 mph were common. A spotter in Tyngsboro reported a peak gust to 63 mph at 920 pm, which occurred just behind the cold front. A gust to 59 mph was reported from West Island on Buzzard's Bay. Other strong wind gusts included 58 mph in Taunton (spotter), 54 mph at the Blue Hill Observatory in Milton, 53 mph in Worcester, 47 mph at Logan International Airport in Boston, and 46 mph in Hyannis. In Dartmouth, in Bristol County, wires were downed by the strong winds. There were many reports of downed branches, some of which caused power outages by falling on wires. Scattered thunderstorms were reported throughout most of the state, however the strong winds were not directly associated with the thunderstorms. The exception was on Martha's Vineyard, where thunderstorms produced a wind gust to 60 mph at the Martha's Vineyard Airport around 900 pm. In Oak Bluffs on the Vineyard, large tree limbs were downed and a small shed was blown down at the high school. Lightning strikes resulted in several power outages, and in central Massachusetts, lightning started an attic fire in Gardner, causing minor damage to a building.

    Begin Date: 18 Jan 1999, 08:16:00 PM EST
    End Date: 18 Jan 1999, 09:20:00 PM EST
    Magnitude: 54 knots

    Begin Date: 18 Jan 1999, 09:04:00 PM EST
    Begin Location: Marthas Vineyard Arp
    Begin LAT/LON: 4124'N / 7037'W
    End Date: 18 Jan 1999, 09:04:00 PM EST
    End Location: Marthas Vineyard Arp
    End LAT/LON: 4124'N / 7037'W
    Magnitude: 52 knots

    Event: Cold
    Begin Date: 19 Jan 1994, 1000 EST
    Description:
    Another surge of very cold Arctic air accompanied by winds of 15 to 30 mph produced wind chills of 25 to 35 below zero. The extreme low wind chills lasted all day on the 19th, except in southeastern Massachusetts.
  • Jan. 19, 1998

  • Event: Flood, Flash Flood, High Wind
    Begin Date: 19 Jan 1996, 03:00:00 PM EST
    End Date: 20 Jan 1996, 02:00:00 AM EST
    Description:
    An intense area of low pressure which was located over the Mid-Atlantic region on Friday morning January 19th produced unseasonably warm temperatures, high dewpoints and strong winds. This resulted in rapid melting of one to three feet of snow. In addition to the rapid snowmelt one to three inches of rain fell as the system moved northeast along the coast. This resulted in the flooding of many small streams across Berkshire County. The Green River also flooded which washed out some side roads and the Williams River flooded some farmland.

    Same Storm: Strong to gale force south winds with gusts to 45 to 65 mph nd with isolated gusts to hurricane force preceded a sharp cold front ext
    Ending from a low pressure system moving east across the northern Great Lakes region. Some peak wind gusts included: Logan International Airport, Boston, 66 mph; Naval Air Station, South Weymouth, 63 mph; Norwood Airport, Norwood, 58 mph; and Blue Hill Observatory, Milton, at an elevation of 660 feet, 88 mph. In Wayland, telephone poles were knocked down closing a road from there to Sudbury. In Duxbury, a church steeple was rocked causing an unknown amount of damage. Scattered power outages affected up to 2,000 electric customers. The high winds also brought a strong January thaw with temperatures rising into the 50s. This combined with heavy rain and snowmelt to cause many reports of street flooding. In Worcester County, in the town of Spencer, heavy runoff caused a 5-foot hole to develop in a portion of Route 31. In western Massachusetts, there were numerous reports of street flooding, road closures, and basement flooding. There was a flash flood along the West Branch of the Westfield River in Huntington with a crest of 9.9 feet; flood stage is 9 feet.

    Same Storm: An intense area of low pressure located over the Mid-Atlantic Region on Friday morning January 19th produced damaging winds across Berkshire County Massachusetts. This storm was associated with a strong southerly flow which resulted in scattered reports of downed trees, limbs and power lines.
  • Jan. 19, 2002 ... MAP
  • Jan 19-20, 2005
  • Jan. 20, 2000 ... MAP
    Event: Heavy Snow
    Begin Date: 20 Jan 2000, 03:00:00 PM EST
    End Date: 21 Jan 2000, 09:00:00 AM EST
    Description:
    Low pressure moving from the Carolina coast to south of Nantucket brought heavy snow to parts of southeast Massachusetts. Snowfall amounts ranged from 5 to 7 inches across interior Plymouth County, to as much as 6 to 10 inches on the outer Cape and Nantucket. Strong winds during the height of the storm downed several large limbs in Eastham, and produced drifts as high as 2 to 3 feet. Minor splashover was also reported on the outer Cape during high tide, but no major damage or flooding resulted.
  • Jan. 20, 2001 ... MAP
    Event: Heavy Snow
    Begin Date: 20 Jan 2001, 09:00:00 PM EST
    End Date: 21 Jan 2001, 12:00:00 PM EST
    Description:
    Heavy snow fell over much of central and eastern Massachusetts. The highest snowfall totals were in Norfolk, Bristol, and Plymouth Counties where many reports of 10 inch storm totals were received. Since the snowstorm occurred over the week
    End there was little significant impact on travel, though Logan International Airport in Boston closed for 40 minutes for snow removal. In Dartmouth, the 70-foot high Dartmouth Sports Dome collapsed under the weight of the heavy, wet snow. No one was inside the complex at the time and there were no injuries. Some snowfall totals from the storm include 11 inches in Mansfield and South Easton; 10 inches in Stoughton, South Weymouth, Plymouth, and at the National Weather Service in Taunton; 8 to 9 inches in Fairhaven, New Bedford, Walpole, Marshfield, Middleboro and Bridgewater; and 6 to 7 inches in Franklin, Cohasset, Pembroke, Worcester, Westboro, Hopkinton, Waltham, Manchester, Winthrop, Bourne, and Sandwich. Official storm totals were 6.5 inches at Worcester Regional Airport and 6 inches at Logan International Airport in Boston.

  • Event: Flash Flood
    Begin Date: 21 Jan 1994, 0000 EST
    Begin Location: Sandisfield
    Description:
    An ice jam formed in the Buck River against a fallen 24-inch thick tree trunk perpendicular to the flow of the river. Water levels rose about 10 to 12 feet and flooded two homes. Town officials declared a local state of emergency until the tree could be removed from the river.

    Event: Strong Wind
    Begin Date: 21 Jan 2000, 06:00:00 PM EST
    End Date: 22 Jan 2000, 05:00:00 AM EST
    Description:
    Arctic high pressure building into the region brought gusty northwest winds and bitterly cold wind chills to Massachusetts. The strongest winds were felt in parts of central and eastern Massachusetts, where wind gusts of 45 to 55 mph were common. There were no reports of wind damage.

    Event: High Wind
    Begin Date: 22 Jan 2003, 07:55:00 PM EST
    End Date: 22 Jan 2003, 07:55:00 PM EST
    End Location: Not Known
    Magnitude: 52 knots
    Description:
    Pocasset A wind gust to 60 mph was reported by a trained spotter in Pocasset. There were no reports of damage.
  • Jan 22-24, 2005 ... MAP ... Image
    Event: Winter Storm, Storm Surge
    Begin Date: 22 Jan 2005, 03:00:00 PM EST
    End Date: 23 Jan 2005, 01:00:00 PM EST
    Description:
    A major winter storm brought heavy snow, high winds, and coastal flooding to southern New England. In Massachusetts, blizzard conditions were reported on Nantucket during the height of the storm, and this was the first blizzard to affect the Bay State since the April Fools storm of 1997. Near blizzard conditions were reported elsewhere as the storm dumped 1 to 3 feet of snow and produced wind gusts as high as 65 mph near the coast. The highest snowfall totals of 2 to 3 feet were reported in eastern Massachusetts, especially along the coast from Boston to Cape Cod. Official snowfall totals included 24.1 inches at Worcester Airport, which was a top 5 snowstorm for Worcester since records began in 1892. The 18.1 inches of snow which fell on the 23rd set a daily snowfall record, breaking the previous record of 12.5 inches set in 1966. At Logan International Airport in Boston, the storm total of 22.5 inches was also a top 5 snowstorm for Boston since records began in 1892. The 13.4 inches of snow which fell on the 23rd set a daily snowfall record, breaking the previous record of 12.4 inches set in 1935. Other official snowfall totals included 19.0 inches at Blue Hill Observatory in Milton and 18.0 inches at the National Weather Service office in Taunton. Minor to moderate coastal flooding was observed around high tide on the 23rd along the length of the eastern Massachusetts coast, from Newburyport to Boston and Cape Cod. Coastal flooding was most severe near Hull, Scituate, and Marshfield where several roads were inundated and evacuations were required.

    Same Storm: Average snowfall total across the county was around 9 inches.

    Same Storm: Coastal flooding A major winter storm brought heavy snow, high winds, and coastal flooding to southern New England. In Massachusetts, blizzard conditions were reported on Nantucket during the height of the storm, and this was the first blizzard to affect the Bay State since the April Fools storm of 1997. Near blizzard conditions were reported elsewhere as the storm dumped 1 to 3 feet of snow and produced wind gusts as high as 65 mph near the coast. The highest snowfall totals of 2 to 3 feet were reported in eastern Massachusetts, especially along the coast from Boston to Cape Cod. Official snowfall totals included 24.1 inches at Worcester Airport, which was a top 5 snowstorm for Worcester since records began in 1892. The 18.1 inches of snow which fell on the 23rd set a daily snowfall record, breaking the previous record of 12.5 inches set in 1966. At Logan International Airport in Boston, the storm total of 22.5 inches was also a top 5 snowstorm for Boston since records began in 1892. The 13.4 inches of snow which fell on the 23rd set a daily snowfall record, breaking the previous record of 12.4 inches set in 1935. Other official snowfall totals included 19.0 inches at Blue Hill Observatory in Milton and 18.0 inches at the National Weather Service office in Taunton. Minor to moderate coastal flooding was observed around high tide on the 23rd along the length of the eastern Massachusetts coast, from Newburyport to Boston and Cape Cod. Coastal flooding was most severe near Hull, Scituate, and Marshfield where several roads were inundated and evacuations were required.
  • Jan. 23, 1998
    Event: Winter Storm, Heavy Rain
    Begin Date: 23 Jan 1998, 03:00:00 AM EST
    End Date: 24 Jan 1998, 01:00:00 AM EST
    Description:
    On January 23 and 24, a winter storm tracked from the North Carolina coast to Cape Cod. This system produced several inches of snow across Berkshire County before the precipitation changed to sleet and heavy freezing rain. There were numerous traffic accidents but only minor injuries.

    Same Storm: Snow accumulated to over 6 inches in parts of central and western Massachusetts before changing to sleet, freezing rain, and finally rain. State police responded to numerous reports of spinouts on Interstates 190, 290, and 495 as the combination of snow changing to freezing rain created very hazardous driving conditions. Some snowfall totals included: Granville, 7.5 inches; Ashburnham, 7.2 inches; Goshen, 6.5 inches; Huntington, North Amherst, and Lowell, all 6.0 inches. After a change to heavy rain, considerable urban and lowland flooding was reported, especially south of the Mass. Turnpike. Lowland flooding was reported along a small stream in Grafton, in Worcester County. Heavy rainfall occurred across central and eastern Massachusetts. Precipitation totals of one and one-half to three inches occurred, with a few places exceeding three inches. Some rainfall totals included: Plymouth, 3.54 inches; New Bedford, 3.42 inches; Foxboro, 3.10 inches; Maynard, 2.73 inches; West Medway, 2.67 inches; Natick, 2.58 inches; Taunton, 2.48 inches; and Worcester, 2.20 inches.
  • Jan. 23-24, 2003
    Event: Heavy Snow
    Begin Date: 23 Jan 2003, 10:00:00 PM EST
    End Date: 24 Jan 2003, 07:00:00 AM EST
    Description:
    Ocean Effect Snow Squalls An ocean storm passing southeast of Georges Bank created a persistent northeast wind over Cape Cod and Nantucket, resulting in bands of ocean effect snow squalls. Accumulations ranged from 2 to 7 inches, with the greatest amounts on the outer Cape. Travel became difficult on Cape Cod, as the combination of falling snow and gusty winds created near whiteout conditions at times. Some specific snowfall totals, as reported by trained spotters, include 7 inches in Wellfleet and East Harwich; 6 inches in Eastham and Chatham; 5 inches in Barnstable; 4 inches in Dennis, Orleans, Brewster, and on Nantucket; 3 inches in Osterville and Mashpee; and 2 inches in Marstons Mills and Sandwich.
  • Jan 23, 2006 ... MAP

  • Event: Flood
    Begin Date: 24 Jan 1999, 04:30:00 PM EST
    Description:
    Ware River South winds gusted to as high as 55 mph in advance of a strong cold front. The strongest winds occurred across eastern Massachusetts, and were accompanied by heavy rain showers and mild temperatures. A peak wind gust to 63 mph was recorded at the Blue Hill Observatory in Milton. Some of the other higher wind gusts reported include 50 mph at Otis Air Force Base in Falmouth, 48 mph in Cohasset, and 47 mph in Plymouth. Scattered showers produced localized rainfall of 2 to 3 inches in a short period of time. The Ware River in Worcester County overflowed its banks, and crested at 4.2 feet on the evening of the 24th, just over its flood stage of 4 feet. No flood damage was reported. Two record high temperatures were also broken. At Worcester Municipal Airport in Worcester, the high temperature of 59 degrees at 843 am broke the previous record high of 56 degrees which was set in 1906. In Boston, the temperature at Logan International Airport reached 62 degrees at 1000 am, which broke the previous record high of 61 degrees which was set in 1967.

    Same Storm: Blue Hill Observatory South winds gusted to as high as 55 mph in advance of a strong cold front. The strongest winds occurred across eastern Massachusetts, and were accompanied by heavy rain showers and mild temperatures. A peak wind gust to 63 mph was recorded at the Blue Hill Observatory in Milton. Some of the other higher wind gusts reported include 50 mph at Otis Air Force Base in Falmouth, 48 mph in Cohasset, and 47 mph in Plymouth. Scattered showers produced localized rainfall of 2 to 3 inches in a short period of time. The Ware River in Worcester County overflowed its banks, and crested at 4.2 feet on the evening of the 24th, just over its flood stage of 4 feet. No flood damage was reported. Two record high temperatures were also broken. At Worcester Municipal Airport in Worcester, the high temperature of 59 degrees at 843 am broke the previous record high of 56 degrees which was set in 1906. In Boston, the temperature at Logan International Airport reached 62 degrees at 1000 am, which broke the previous record high of 61 degrees which was set in 1967.

    Same Storm: South winds gusted to as high as 55 mph in advance of a strong cold front. The strongest winds occurred across eastern Massachusetts, and were accompanied by heavy rain showers and mild temperatures. A peak wind gust to 63 mph was recorded at the Blue Hill Observatory in Milton. Some of the other higher wind gusts reported include 50 mph at Otis Air Force Base in Falmouth, 48 mph in Cohasset, and 47 mph in Plymouth. Scattered showers produced localized rainfall of 2 to 3 inches in a short period of time. The Ware River in Worcester County overflowed its banks, and crested at 4.2 feet on the evening of the 24th, just over its flood stage of 4 feet. No flood damage was reported. Two record high temperatures were also broken. At Worcester Municipal Airport in Worcester, the high temperature of 59 degrees at 843 am broke the previous record high of 56 degrees which was set in 1906. In Boston, the temperature at Logan International Airport reached 62 degrees at 1000 am, which broke the previous record high of 61 degrees which was set in 1967.

    Event: Flood
    Begin Date: 24 Jan 2005, 12:00:00 PM EST
    End Date: 26 Jan 2005, 12:00:00 PM EST
    Description:
    Millers River in Athol An ice dam which formed on the Millers River in Athol caused flooding and forced the evacuation of several nearby homes. The ice dam formed in a half-mile area between the Exchange Street and Main Street bridges, and brought the river about two and a half feet above normal, flooding homes on Shore Drive and Pequiog Avenue.

    Event: High Wind
    Begin Date: 24 Jan 1996, 01:00:00 PM EST
    End Date: 24 Jan 1996, 07:00:00 PM EST
    Description:
    A strong low pressure system moving northeast through the eastern Great Lakes region and its accompanying trailing cold front produced a period of strong and gusty south to southwest winds. The highest wind gusts of 60 mph and more were confined to higher elevations. Blue Hill Observatory in Milton, at an elevation of 660 feet, recorded the highest peak wind gust to 82 mph around 2:30 PM. A peak gust to 53 mph was recorded in Easton and a gust to 58 mph was reported from Cape Cod.
  • Jan 24-25, 2006
  • Jan. 25, 1998
  • Jan. 25, 2000 ... MAP
    Event: Heavy Snow
    Begin Date: 25 Jan 2000, 06:00:00 AM EST
    End Date: 25 Jan 2000, 06:00:00 PM EST Forecast
    Description:
    A winter storm passing across southeast Massachusetts brought heavy snow to western and central parts of the state, as well as to interior northeast Massachusetts. Storm totals as high as 8 to 15 inches were observed in Franklin and northern Worcester Counties, with generally 5 to 10 inches along the east slopes of the Berkshires, along the Mass Pike as far east as I-495, and along the I-495 corridor from the Mass Pike to Andover. The highest total reported was 15 inches in Athol. Despite the heavy snow, very few accidents were reported in western and central Massachusetts. Farther east, snow turned to mixed precipitation and eventually rain, limiting snowfall amounts from Boston to Cape Cod. Logan International Airport in Boston received a total of 3.5 inches, but the airport was closed from late morning until mid afternoon, causing about 400 flights to be canceled.

    Same Storm: Low pressure developed across the southeastern U.S. on Monday, January 24. This storm consolidated along the coast of Georgia, then began to rapidly deepen early on January 25. The storm turned north, hugging the coastline as it moved just to the east of Boston by early January 26. The result was a large swath of heavy snow, generally in the 6 to 12 inch range, across the Berkshires. Specific snowfall amounts included 10 inches at Monterey and 12 inches at Lenox Dale.

  • Event: Ice Floes
    Begin Date: 26 Jan 1994, 0800 EST
    Begin Location: Chatham
    Description:
    Strong northeast winds caused drifting blocks and sheets of ice, causing damage to boats in Pleasant Bay. Two 20-ft. boats capsized and others were cast afloat and suffered hull or engine damage.
  • Jan. 26-27, 2003
  • Jan 26-27, 2005

  • Event: Cold
    Begin Date: 27 Jan 1994, 0000 EST
    Description:
    Clear, calm conditions and deep snow cover resulted in strong radiational cooling and temperatures dropping far below zero in the lowest areas. Some of the lowest temperatures included: S. Amherst, -32 degrees; Lanesboro, -30 degrees; Spencer, -24; Pittsfield, -22; and Grafton, -21 degrees. Unlike the episodes of very cold weather earlier in January which affected the entire state and included very low wind chills, this extreme cold was most intense in central and western Massachusetts and wind was not a factor in these areas.
  • Jan. 27, 1999

  • Event: High Wind
    Begin Date: 27 Jan 1996, 07:00:00 AM EST
    End Date: 27 Jan 1996, 09:00:00 PM EST
    Description:
    A strong low pressure system developed over the Great Plains on Friday January 26th and tracked northeast to the upper Great Lakes by the 27th. This system produced damaging winds across Berkshire County Massachusetts from Saturday morning through the evening hours. The damaging winds downed many trees, limbs and power lines across this area.
  • Jan 27-28, 2004
    Event: Winter Storm
    Begin Date: 27 Jan 2004, 07:00:00 PM EST
    End Date: 28 Jan 2004, 04:00:00 PM EST
    Description:
    A winter storm tracking south of New England brought heavy snow to southern New England, from western Massachusetts into much of Connecticut and southern Rhode Island. In Massachusetts, heavy snow fell across the higher elevations of western and north central Massachusetts. Heavy snow also fell on Nantucket, which was on the northern edge of the heavy snow associated with the storm. Snowfall totals of 4 to 8 inches were common in these areas. Amounts were significantly lower across much of eastern Massachusetts. High pressure over the Gulf of Maine provided enough dry air at low levels to cause precipitation to evaporate as it headed toward Boston. Eventually, the dry air eroded and allowed for 2 to 5 inches of snow to accumulate, mostly during the tail
    End of the storm. Official snowfall totals included 4.9 inches at Worcester Airport, 3.4 inches at the National Weather Service office in Taunton, 2.7 inches at Blue Hill Observatory in Milton, and 1.5 inches at Logan International Airport in Boston. Other snowfall totals, as reported by trained spotters, included 9 inches in Leverett, 7 inches in Montague; Colrain, Greenfield, South Hadley, Amherst, Easthampton, Brimfield, Granville, Wilbraham, West Brookfield, and Nantucket; and 6 inches in Ware, Huntington, Southwick, Westfield, Fitchburg, and Hopedale.

  • Event: Freezing Rain
    Begin Date: 27 Jan 1994, 2200 EST
    End Date: 28 Jan 1994, 1200 EST
    Description:
    Strong to gale force south winds brought a surge of very moist air and much warmer temperatures across the entire state. Heavy rainfall and melting snow combined to produce widespread street flooding. In western Massachusetts, temperatures rose 80 degrees in about 30 hours: from 30 below zero early on January 27th to 45 to 50 degrees by the afternoon on the 28th! Precipitation began as snow, changed briefly to freezing rain, then to all rain, except in Berkshire County where freezing rain persisted until noon on the 28th. A coating of glaze up to one-half inch thick was observed in that area. The weight of snow and ice caused the collapse of a roof at a commercial building in Hudson. In the eastern part of the state, south winds were sustained at 30 to 40 mph with gusts to around 60 mph. At the National Weather Service Forecast Office in Taunton, winds were estimated up to around 60 mph, while at the Blue Hill Observatory in Milton, elevation 670 feet, the peak gust was recorded at 78 mph in the late afternoon. Drifting ice floes caused an estimated $20 thousand damage at Seaport Landing Marina in Lynn.

    Event: Winter Storm
    Begin Date: 27 Jan 1997, 07:00:00 PM EST
    End Date: 28 Jan 1997, 12:00:00 PM EST
    Description:
    On January 27 and 28, a winter storm tracked from northern Indiana northeast to the Saint Lawrence Valley. A general snow accumulation of 4 to 7 inches fell across Berkshire County. The precipitation changed to sleet and freezing rain during the morning of January 28, then briefly to light rain before ending.

    Same Storm: Strong south winds were reported from the eastern part of the state. Sustained south winds of nearly 40 mph with a gust to 60 mph was reported at Blue Hill, just south of Boston, in Milton. A peak gust to 62 mph was reported at Eastham on Cape Cod Bay. Pocasset reported a peak gust to 51 mph.

    Event: Winter Storm
    Begin Date: 28 Jan 2004, 12:00:00 AM EST
    End Date: 28 Jan 2004, 04:00:00 AM EST
    Description:
    A complex low pressure area moved into the Ohio Valley on January 27. Energy from this storm transferred across the Appalachians to form a secondary storm, off the mid Atlantic coast by midnight. This second storm moved northeast, south of Long Island. The two systems combined to produce a marginal winter storm event across western Massachussetts as a band of moderate to heavy snow moved over the area from around midnight into the early morning hours of the 28th. The temperature profile was cold enough for all snow. Around 7 inches of snow fell across Berkshire County with Dalton reporting 7.5 inches and Savoy 7.3 inches.
  • Jan. 28, 1998
    Event: Strong Winds
    Begin Date: 28 Jan 1998, 05:00:00 PM EST
    End Date: 29 Jan 1998, 12:00:00 PM EST
    Description:
    A large and powerful slow moving ocean storm passing across the Atlantic Ocean to the south of Cape Cod brought strong southeast winds to southeastern Massachusetts, with high tides and beach erosion affecting north and east facing coastal areas. The strong northeast winds before high tide piled water toward shore and combined with astronomically high tides to produce coastal flooding. Some peak wind gusts reported late on January 28th included: Buzzards Bay Buoy, 52 mph at 5 PM; Boston Buoy, 45 mph at 9 PM and midnight. Some peak wind gusts reported during the morning of January 29th included: Nantucket, 53 mph at 1:15 AM; Bourne, 52 mph at 2 AM; Dennis, 46 mph; and Martha's Vineyard, 45 mph. Coastal flooding was reported along the coast south of Boston at Hull and Scituate, where shore roads were closed because crashing waves sent rocks and other debris over sea walls. The tide in Scituate was reported to be about 3 feet above normal. An 80-foot section of the most vulnerable sea wall in Scituate collapsed in the aftermath of the storm, on the tide following the noon high tide on January 29th. This left a section of one coastal road completely (but temporarily) unprotected. Farther south along the coast of Marshfield, in the Brant Rock section, the surf washed over cars parked near a pier and flooded several streets. On Cape Cod, three dozen dolphins died after being stranded on Cape beaches by the high tide. On Nantucket Island, Pebble Beach parking lot was relocated due to erosion and high tide was reported to be 2.5 feet above normal. On Martha's Vineyard, flooding was reported at Edgartown and at several other points along the coast. In the Boston area, high tides forced the closing of several coastal roads to the north and south of the city. Roads were closed for about one hour around the time of the noon high tide. However, in Winthrop, one coastal causeway was closed for two hours.

  • Event: Coastal Flood
    Begin Date: 29 Jan 1998, 10:00:00 AM EST
    End Date: 29 Jan 1998, 02:00:00 PM EST
    Description:
    A large and powerful slow moving ocean storm passing across the Atlantic Ocean to the south of Cape Cod brought strong southeast winds to southeastern Massachusetts, with high tides and beach erosion affecting north and east facing coastal areas. The strong northeast winds before high tide piled water toward shore and combined with astronomically high tides to produce coastal flooding. Some peak wind gusts reported late on January 28th included: Buzzards Bay Buoy, 52 mph at 5 PM; Boston Buoy, 45 mph at 9 PM and midnight. Some peak wind gusts reported during the morning of January 29th included: Nantucket, 53 mph at 1:15 AM; Bourne, 52 mph at 2 AM; Dennis, 46 mph; and Martha's Vineyard, 45 mph. Coastal flooding was reported along the coast south of Boston at Hull and Scituate, where shore roads were closed because crashing waves sent rocks and other debris over sea walls. The tide in Scituate was reported to be about 3 feet above normal. An 80-foot section of the most vulnerable sea wall in Scituate collapsed in the aftermath of the storm, on the tide following the noon high tide on January 29th. This left a section of one coastal road completely (but temporarily) unprotected. Farther south along the coast of Marshfield, in the Brant Rock section, the surf washed over cars parked near a pier and flooded several streets. On Cape Cod, three dozen dolphins died after being stranded on Cape beaches by the high tide. On Nantucket Island, Pebble Beach parking lot was relocated due to erosion and high tide was reported to be 2.5 feet above normal. On Martha's Vineyard, flooding was reported at Edgartown and at several other points along the coast. In the Boston area, high tides forced the closing of several coastal roads to the north and south of the city. Roads were closed for about one hour around the time of the noon high tide. However, in Winthrop, one coastal causeway was closed for two hours.

    Event: Flood
    Begin Date: 29 Jan 1996, 01:00:00 AM EST
    End Date: 30 Jan 1996, 04:00:00 PM EST
    Description:
    Preceding a sharp cold front, which was approaching from the west, gale to storm force south winds with gusts to hurricane force, heavy rainfall of 1 to 2 inches, and very mild temperatures rising into the 50s occurred. There were many wind gusts reported in the range of 50 to 70 mph with isolated gusts to 80 to 90 mph. A peak gust to 67 mph was recorded at the Blue Hill Observatory in Milton at an elevation of 660 feet. This was the strongest wind gust at this weather station since Hurricane Gloria in September, 1985. There were numerous trees and tree limbs being blown down, causing scattered power outages. There also were many reports of property damage, including an 80-foot section of roof torn from a hangar at Worcester Municipal Airport, where a gust to 52 mph was recorded by the automated weather station. In Tyngsboro, a large tree limb crashed down, crushing and destroying two automobiles and narrowly missing the driver of one of those vehicles. In Newton, a 100-foot by 20-foot section of roof blew off an office building and a tree crashed into the second story of a house. In Quincy, an exterior wall was ripped from a condominium but the building remained habitable. In Marlboro, a large sign broke loose, downing a power cable. Street flooding was reported in many areas during the heavy rain as snow and ice clogged catch basins. Rainfall totals ranged from 1.5 to 2.0 inches in the Greater Boston area. Minor flooding occurred along several rivers within 12 to 48 hours following the heavy rainfall. Three rivers in eastern Massachusetts had minor flooding, including the Charles, Blackstone, and Nashua. The Charles river crested at 5.1 feet at Dover at 8 AM on the 28thh and again at 5.1 feet at 7 PM on the 30th; flood stage there is 5.0 feet. The Blackstone River crested at 9.2 feet at Northbridge at 6 AM on the 28th; flood stage is 9.0 feet. The Nashua River crested at East Pepperell on the 29th at 10 PM at 8.5 feet; flood stage is 8.0 feet.
  • Jan. 30, 1998
  • Jan. 30, 2000 ... MAP

  • Event: Freezing Rain
    Begin Date: 30 Jan 2001, 07:00:00 AM EST
    End Date: 30 Jan 2001, 02:00:00 PM EST
    Description:
    Freezing rain resulted in dozens of minor accidents throughout central and western Massachusetts.

    Event: Freezing Drizzle
    Begin Date: 31 Jan 1997, 07:00:00 PM EST
    End Date: 31 Jan 1997, 11:59:00 PM EST
    Description:
    Light freezing drizzle coated highways with a thin layer of glaze and caused dozens of crashes including a series of pile-ups on both sides of Route 495 in Franklin, which involved 40 cars. The crashes resulted in both Routes 495 and 140 being shut down for more than an hour after 8 PM. There also were numerous accidents in the Boston area and as far south as Pembroke and Duxbury, where there was a 15-car pile-up on Route 3. A 16-car pile-up was reported in Canton near the junction of Route 128 and Route 95. A 4-car pile-up was reported in Quincy. Only minor injuries resulted from the automobile crashes.

    Event: Winter Storm
    Begin Date: 31 Jan 2000, 02:00:00 AM EST
    End Date: 31 Jan 2000, 09:00:00 AM EST
    Description:
    Low pressure formed in the Gulf States on January 29. This storm tracked northeast along the piedmont of North Carolina, the DelMarVa Peninsula, coastal New Jersey and western Long Island on January 30. It reached Cape Cod early on January 30 and the Gulf of Maine later in the day. The storm brought 4 to 8 inches of snow across the Berkshires.

    source: NWS archives

    Full January Moon

    JanuarywolfThe Earth reaches perihelion, its closest approach to the Sun, at a distance of 91,399,727 miles on January 3rd in 2007. This will coincide with the Full Wolf Moon.

    Looking ahead into 2007, there will be a "Blue Moon" in May. May's first full moon will be on May Day (Beltane) , May 1, and its second on May 31.

    The Night Skies - January

    Weekly notable night sky events can be found in This Week's Sky at a Glance at SkyTonight.com.

    Two good sources for what to view and when are the UCAR Windows to the Universe and the
    University of Wisconsin-Madison Constellations Sorted by Month

    Aries Best viewed in the month of January are:

    • Caelum
    • Dorado
    • Mensa
    • Orion
    • Reticulum
    • Taurus

    Taurus
    Graphics source: www.astro.wisc.edu








    The "Clear Sky Clock"

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    The "Daylight Savings Change for 2007"

    Daylight Savings Time dates are changing in 2007

    With the passage of the Energy Policy Act of 2005, Pub. L. no. 109-58, 119 Stat 594 (2005), starting in March 2007, daylight time in the United States will begin on the second Sunday in March and end on the first Sunday in November. (see also)

    SEC. 110. DAYLIGHT SAVINGS.

        (a) Amendment.--Section 3(a) of the Uniform Time Act of 1966 (15 
    U.S.C. 260a(a)) is amended--
                (1) by striking ``first Sunday of April'' and inserting
            ``second Sunday of March''; and
                (2) by striking ``last Sunday of October'' and inserting
            ``first Sunday of November''.

        (b) Effective Date.--Subsection (a) <<NOTE: 15 USC 260a
    note.>> shall take effect 1 year after the date of enactment of this Act
    or March 1, 2007, whichever is later.

        (c) Report to Congress.--Not <<NOTE: 15 USC 260a note.>> later than
    9 months after the effective date stated in subsection (b), the
    Secretary shall report to Congress on the impact of this section on
    energy consumption in the United States.

        (d) Right to Revert.--Congress retains the right to revert the
    Daylight Saving Time back to the 2005 time schedules once the Department
    study is complete.

    From the Microsoft webpage "2007 time zone update for Microsoft Windows operating systems"

    "
    Starting in the spring of 2007, daylight saving time (DST)   start and end dates for the United States will transition to comply with the   Energy Policy Act of 2005. DST dates in the United States will start three   weeks earlier (2:00 A.M. on the second Sunday in March) and will end one week   later (2:00 A.M. on the first Sunday in November)."

    related website: US Naval Observatory: When Does Daylight Time Begin and End ?

    "In 2006, daylight time begins on April 2 and ends on October 29."
    "In 2007, daylight time begins on March 11 and ends on November 4.        [New law goes into effect.]"

    Thanks to viewer Dick N for sending us this heads-up!
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